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Divorce Options Workshop

Become The Hero To Your Aging Parent Workshop

Table of Contents
1. How children react to divorce
2. How divorce affects children in the long term
3. How to help children cope with divorce
4. Tips for divorced parents

Divorce is a major life change for children of all ages. It can be a difficult and stressful time, and it can have a significant impact on their emotional, psychological, and social development.

How Children React To Divorce

Children react to divorce in different ways, depending on their age, temperament, and the specific circumstances of their parents’ divorce. Some common reactions include:

  • Sadness and grief: Children may feel a deep sense of sadness and loss after their parents’ divorce. They may miss living with both parents in the same home, and they may worry about losing contact with one parent.
  • Anger and resentment: Children may feel angry and resentful towards their parents, either for getting divorced or for the way they are handling the divorce. They may also feel angry at themselves for not being able to prevent the divorce.
  • Confusion and guilt: Children may feel confused about why their parents are getting divorced, and they may blame themselves for the divorce. They may also worry about what the divorce will mean for their future.
  • Anxiety and fear: Children may feel anxious and fearful about the changes that divorce will bring to their lives. They may worry about moving to a new home, changing schools, and spending less time with one parent.
  • Behavioral problems: Children may act out in negative ways in response to divorce. This may include acting aggressively, withdrawing socially, or having difficulty concentrating in school.

How Divorce Affects Children In The Long Term

Research has shown that divorce can have both positive and negative long-term effects on children. Children from divorced families are more likely to experience a variety of problems, including:

  • Academic difficulties: Children from divorced families are more likely to have difficulty in school. They may have lower grades, higher dropout rates, and more attendance problems.
  • Behavioral problems: Children from divorced families are more likely to have behavioral problems, such as aggression, delinquency, and substance abuse.
  • Mental health problems: Children from divorced families are more likely to experience mental health problems, such as anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem.
  • Relationship problems: Children from divorced families are more likely to have difficulty forming and maintaining healthy relationships in adulthood.

However, it is important to note that not all children are negatively affected by divorce. Many children can adjust to divorce and go on to live happy and successful lives. The key to success for most children is a positive co-parenting relationship. When children are placed in the middle or subjected to continued conflict and drama from parents, they lose. They win when parents cooperate, maintain similar boundaries in the home, and discipline is consistent between households. 

How To Help Children Cope With Divorce

There are several things that parents can do to help their children cope with divorce:

  • Be honest and open with your children. Children need to know what is happening and why their parents are getting divorced. It is important to be honest with your children, but also to be age-appropriate. Do not overshare or place blame on the other parent.
  • Reassure your children that they are loved. Children need to know that they are loved by both parents, even though their parents are no longer together. Remind your children that the divorce is not their fault.
  • Maintain a consistent routine. Children thrive on routine, so it is important to maintain a consistent routine as much as possible after a divorce. This includes having regular mealtimes, bedtimes, and visitation schedules.
  • Allow your children to express their feelings. It is important to allow your children to express their feelings about the divorce, whether they are positive or negative. Let them know that it is okay to feel sad, angry, confused, or scared.
  • Seek professional help if needed. If your child is struggling to cope with the divorce, or if you are concerned about their behavior, mental health, or academic performance, seek professional help from a therapist or counselor.

Tips For Divorced Parents

Here are some tips for divorced parents on how to help their children cope with the divorce:

  • Avoid conflict in front of your children. Children are easily affected by conflict between their parents. Avoid arguing or fighting with your ex-spouse in front of your children.
  • Do not badmouth your ex-spouse to your children. It is important to avoid badmouthing your ex-spouse to your children. This can damage their relationship with the other parent. Everyone loses when a parent is thrown under the bus, especially the children. 
  • Work together to co-parent your children. This is THE MOST IMPORTANT variant for the success of children from divorce. This means communicating effectively with each other and making decisions together about your children’s upbringing.
  • Be patient and understanding. It takes time for children to adjust to divorce. Be patient and understanding with your children as they work through their emotions and adjust to the changes in their lives.

Conclusion

Divorce can be a difficult and stressful experience for children of all ages. However, there are several things that parents can do to help their children cope with divorce and adjust to the changes in their lives. By being honest and open with their children, reassuring them that they are loved, maintaining a consistent routine, and allowing them to express their feelings, parents can help their children weather this difficult time.

In addition to the tips above, here are some other things that divorced parents can do to help their children:

  • Encourage your children to stay in touch with both parents. Children need to have a strong relationship with both parents, even after a divorce. Encourage your children to talk to their other parents on the phone, visit them regularly, and participate in activities with them.
  • Help your children build strong relationships with other adults. In addition to their parents, children need other adults in their lives who can support them and care for them. Encourage your children to spend time with grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and other trusted adults.
  • Get involved in your children’s school and activities. Parents need to be involved in their children’s lives, even after a divorce. Attend school events, volunteer in your children’s classrooms, and coach their sports teams.
  • Take care of yourself. Divorced parents need to take care of themselves, both physically and emotionally. Make sure you are getting enough sleep, eating healthy foods, and exercising regularly. Also, find time to relax and de-stress.

Remember, you are not alone. There are many resources available to help divorced parents and their children. Talk to your doctor, therapist, or religious leader for support. You can also find helpful information and resources online and in your community.

With love, support, and understanding, children can adjust to divorce and go on to live happy and successful lives.

We offer a FREE Co-Parenting Workshop. You can either watch a past workshop or sign up for the next live workshop.

We offer a FREE 15-minute phone consultation if your need is immediate.